Specifically for the Dentist

1. How does a dentist anesthesiologist differ from a dentist who offers sedation?
2. What is a dental anesthesia residency like?
3. Is Dr. Allred trained to nasally intubate?
4. Why use a dentist anesthesiologist instead of a physician anesthesiologist or a nurse anesthetist?
5. I have not performed dentistry on an anesthetized patient before. Is this a problem?
6. How do we schedule you to come to our office?
7. What do you require to come to our office?

For the Patient

1. What is a dentist anesthesiologist?
2. Do you have your own office? Can I come to you?
3. What age groups can have anesthesia?
4. Do you treat patients with special needs?
5. Will the anesthesia or dentistry hurt?
6. How soon can I go back to work or school?
7. What if I’m not sure if it’s right for me?
8. What is the difference between sedation and general anesthesia?
9. How do I choose between sedation and general anesthesia?

Safety

1. Is Anesthesia Safe?
2. I’m worried that my medical conditions will make anesthesia unsafe for me.
3. How do you know that I’m okay if I’m sleeping?
4. What happens if I am sick on the day of my appointment?

Payment

1. What are the costs?
2. What forms of payment to you accept?
3. When is my payment due?
4. Will my insurance cover anesthesia in the dentist’s office?


1. How does a dentist anesthesiologist differ from a dentist who offers sedation?
Dentist anesthesiologists have completed an additional two to three years of residency after graduating from dental school. During this time they study only anesthesia, which provides for unparalleled knowledge and training.

A dentist that provides only sedation completes a short continuing education course and is limited to administering one type of anesthesia: conscious sedation. A dentist anesthesiologist can administer all levels of anesthesia – sedation through general anesthesia – to not only just healthy adults, but also pediatric and medically compromised patients.

In the field of dentistry, dentist anesthesiologists are the experts on anesthesia. Dentist anesthesiologists are often the instructors who teach other dentists their sedation courses. Dr. Allred is a dentist anesthesiologist.


2. What is a dental anesthesia residency like?
A Dental Anesthesiology residency is a 2-3 year residency dedicated to the full time study of anesthesiology. Dental Anesthesia residents complete coursework and medical rotations in areas of medicine specific to anesthesia such as cardiology (reading and interpreting EKGs), internal medicine and pharmacology. In his internal medicine rotations, Dr. Allred treated patients for a wide variety of ailments, from hypertension to hepatitis. This training is necessary to understanding the complex medical histories of medically compromised patients. Additionally, Dr. Allred spent 10 months providing general anesthesia in the hospital operating room for everything from emergency trauma cases to knee and hip replacements. The remainder of his residency was spent providing general anesthesia for dental patients (mostly pediatric and special needs) in an outpatient dental clinic setting.


3. Is Dr. Allred trained to nasally intubate?
Yes, Dr. Allred has extensive training and is proficient at nasal intubation as well as oral intubation and open airway techniques. Most dentists prefer the patient to be nasally intubated so that they have unrestricted access to perform the dentistry. Dentist Anesthesiologists are the specialists in nasal intubation.


4. Why use a dentist anesthesiologist instead of a physician anesthesiologist or a nurse anesthetist?
Physician anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists are specifically trained to work in a hospital setting. Dr. Allred has trained in a hospital setting, but additionally was trained and is comfortable providing anesthesia in an outpatient dental office setting. Therefore he understands and is experienced with the unique requirements of this type of anesthesia, such as nasal intubation.

Dr. Allred also has extensive experience with pediatric patients. He saw significantly more pediatric patients for general anesthesia than the average physician anesthesiologist or nurse anesthetist did during their training.

Additionally, because Dr. Allred was trained as a dentist and practiced dentistry for 2 years before his anesthesia residency, he is familiar with the head and neck area, the special requirements of the procedures being performed and the in and outs of how dental offices function.


5. I have not performed dentistry on an anesthetized patient before. Is this a problem?
This is not a problem at all. We are here to answer all of your questions. Dr. Allred will walk you through each step of the process and make sure you are comfortable. Many dentists prefer treating their patients this way because it’s easy and productive.


6. How do we schedule you to come to our office?
If you would like to utilize the services of Portland Dental Anesthesia in your office, please call us at (503)858-4880 to discuss specifics. Most the necessary forms (health history, financial arrangements, pre- and post-operative instructions etc.) can be found under the forms section of this website. Additionally we have a packet for your office manager that will include specific instructions for how to schedule your patients for available times on our calendar.


7. What do you require to come to our office?
Your office does not need any special equipment in order to have Portland Dental Anesthesia provide patients with anesthesia in your office. We bring all the necessary equipment and monitors with us. We may ask to visit the office to see how things are set up prior to the first appointment.

For the patient


1. What is a dentist anesthesiologist?
A dentist anesthesiologist is a dentist that has completed a residency in anesthesiology after graduating from dental school. The dentist spends at least two years studying only anesthesia, which provides for unparalleled knowledge and training.

There are several differences between a dentist that provides sedation and the services provided by a dentist anesthesiologist. Most dentists that provide only sedation are usually for patients who only need mild sedation for their dental treatment. A dentist anesthesiologist can administer all levels of anesthesia – sedation through general anesthesia – using a variety of anesthetic agents and anesthetic techniques to not only just healthy adults, but also pediatric and medically compromised patients.

In the field of dentistry, dentist anesthesiologists are the experts on anesthesia. Dentist anesthesiologists are often the instructors who teach other dentists their sedation courses. Dr. Allred is a dentist anesthesiologist.


2. Do you have your own office? Can I come to you?
We are a mobile anesthesia service. We work with patients and dentists all over Oregon and SW Washington. This allows for greater access so that everybody can receive the benefit of anesthesia in the dentist’s office.


3. What age groups can have anesthesia?
Most everybody can safely receive anesthesia. Dr. Allred is experienced and specifically trained to care for patients of all ages. Dr. Allred routinely cares for pediatric patients as well as adults and geriatric patients.


4. Do you treat patients with special needs?
Yes. Dr. Allred has provided anesthesia for many patients with special needs and has helped them to access the dental care they need.


5. Will the anesthesia or dentistry hurt?
The anesthesia itself is painless and very effective at minimizing pain from the dental procedure. You will be comfortable throughout the procedure and recovery. Your dentist will send you home with a prescription for pain medication if your procedure necessitates it.


6. How soon can I go back to work or school?
Most patients feel awake and alert about thirty minutes after waking up. However, it’s important to know that even though you feel okay the anesthesia might still affect your ability to drive and make important decisions. To be safe, you should plan on resting, avoiding important decisions, and not driving for 24 hours after your anesthetic.


7. What if I’m not sure if it’s right for me?
Only you can make the decision to have sedation or general anesthesia for your dental care. We’re happy to give you all of the information you need to make that decision for yourself. If we haven’t answered your questions here, please give us a call or send us an email. We’re happy to answer any questions.


8. What is the difference between sedation and general anesthesia?
During sedation cases, we give the patient enough anesthetic to feel comfortable and relaxed. The patient is awake the entire time or is arousable with stimulation, such as a tap on the shoulder.

During general anesthesia cases, we give the patient enough anesthetic to fall completely asleep.
If you elect to receive sedation, it’s possible that you might remember certain parts of the procedure.

Both sedation and general anesthesia are safe. Your heart rate, blood pressure, breathing, and oxygenation are always measured regardless of the type of anesthetic.


9. How do I choose between sedation and general anesthesia?
For some patients, sedation is not enough to make them comfortable due to situations such as drug tolerance, young age, medical conditions, or extreme phobia. In these instances, general anesthesia is the best option.

In other cases, patient preference dictates sedation versus general anesthesia. Is being comfortable but awake okay with you? Or would you prefer to be completely asleep?

Safety


1. Is Anesthesia Safe?
Yes, anesthesia is very safe. Modern anesthetics have a very low chance of side effects, especially when administered by a trained professional such as Dr. Allred.

There are risks associated with many everyday activities and the same is true with anesthesia. Dr. Allred mitigates these risks by using safe drugs, thorough monitoring, and a background of valuable experience to provide a good outcome for his patients. Sometimes it helps to put the risk in this perspective, driving to your dental appointment carries more risk than undergoing anesthesia.

To learn more about the extensive anesthesia training and knowledge of dentist anesthesiologists, read the first FAQ above titled, “What is a dentist anesthesist?” and read Dr. Allred’s bio on the home page.


2. I’m worried that my medical conditions will make anesthesia unsafe for me.
Having a medical condition doesn’t mean that anesthesia is automatically unsafe for you. Dr. Allred will take into account all aspects of your medical history to develop a safe anesthetic plan just for you. Often a consultation with your regular doctor can ensure that your medications are optimized and that anesthesia is safe.


3. How do you know that I’m okay if I’m sleeping?
When you are under anesthesia, every aspect of your well-being will be monitored. Dr. Allred will keep constant track of your heart rate, breathing, blood pressure, and oxygenation throughout the procedure and recovery. This allows the Dr. Allred to correct trends before they become problems, which means that you’ll wake up comfortable and happy.


4. What happens if I am sick on the day of my appointment?
Anesthesia is the safest when you are feeling well. If Dr. Allred determines that you are too ill for anesthesia you will need to have your appointment rescheduled. You will not lose your deposit.

Payment


1. What are the costs?
The anesthesia fee is determined primarily by the length of the dental treatment needed. Generally your dentist will provide you with an estimate of the costs after they have determined how long your treatment should take. You may call our office (503-858-4880) and we will be happy to provide you an estimate of the costs.


2. What forms of payment to you accept?
We accept cash and all major credit cards and Care Credit. We do not accept personal or business checks.


3. When is my payment due?
On the day of scheduling a $150 deposit will be charged to reserve your anesthesiologist for that portion of the day. The rest of the estimated treatment cost is due at the time of service. The deposit is refundable up until 48 hours prior to your appointment.


4. Will my insurance cover anesthesia in the dentist’s office?
Every insurance plan is different and therefore there is not a clear answer to this question. You will have to check your own insurance provider and determine what if any coverage is available. Our office does not accept Pre-determination of Benefits as payment for services rendered. Payment must be paid in full on the date of service regardless of your insurance benefits. We do not bill your insurance but can provide a receipt of the services rendered which can be send to the insurance company for direct reimbursement